How much can we afford to forget, if we train machines to remember?

Read the full essay at Aeonhttps://aeon.co/ideas/how-much-can-we-afford-to-forget-if-we-train-machines-to-remember “As the internet grows ever more powerful and comprehensive, why bother to remember and retain information? If students can access the world’s knowledge on a smartphone, why should they be required to carry so much of it around in their heads?” Gene TracyChancellor professor of physics at William &…

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David Attenborough- and some penguins, some gorillas, and a pretty lizard

I have been watching David Attenborough for as long as I can remember. This clip recalls some of his earlier work, from long before I encountered him, as well as the more well-known pieces. Including the gorillas of course, and new to me, the baby (blind) rhinoceros. The lizard is Attenborough’s fan-throated lizard (Sitana attenboroughii),…

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Thomas Savery, and a new invention for raising of water and occasioning motion by the impellent force of fire

Thomas Newcomen and James Watt are the names I think of regarding early steam engine development. Yet, it was a Thomas Savery, who on July 2nd, 1698 first patented the idea of an early steam ‘engine’, or perhaps more precisely its direct predecessor since it had no moving parts. It was as Savery explained: “A new invention…

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The Chilwell catastrophe: Fatal explosion on the home front

It is the pictures of the vast warehouses of shells, six hundred thousand of them, that is most shocking: that they could all be fired in just two or three days. Heritage Calling On 1 July 1918, at 7.10pm, a catastrophic explosion tore through the National Shell Filling Factory at Chilwell, Nottinghamshire. The blast killed…

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Tower Bridge: Happy Birthday!

Combined Bascule and Suspension Bridge Tower Bridge was officially opened on this day in 1894. I have long been enchanted by it: as a fascinating piece of engineering it is the only combined bascule and suspension bridge I’ve seen; and as a monumental piece of Victorian Gothic architecture. I first saw it as a child,…

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A Tediously Accurate Scale Model of the Solar System

A lovely scale model of the solar system, using the scale of one pixel to the diameter of the moon, roughly the distance between London and Tehran. Do note the shortcuts to the planets, the strange little hieroglyphs along the top of the page. Saves a lot of scrolling! http://joshworth.com/dev/pixelspace/pixelspace_solarsystem.html

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